Posts Tagged ‘Mario Bava’

Shock

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

All good things must come to an end as just as Mario Bava’s cinematic career did, so does our Bava, Bava and Freda season, with Shock. Written and partly directed by Lamberto Bava, this is a well made but rather forgettable horror film.

Lisa and Mario Bava

Thursday, October 27th, 2011

And so we are coming to the end of the Bava, Bava and Freda season. I look today at a film that could probably be considered Bava’s best, his very personal project – Lisa and the Devil. Unfortunately in an era of exploitation this beautifully dreamlike film did not stand a chance and so producer Alfredo Leone added in an Exorcist rip-off subplot and re-edited the film to create the rather less than impressive House of Exorcism.

I have also finally completed work on the 4,300 word Mario Bava biography with links to all the reviews and loads of information about the director.

Just one more bio and two more film reviews to go…

Operazione paura

Monday, October 24th, 2011

And so finally back to horror for the final week of the Bava, Bava and Freda season. Although saddled with horrible titles in the US and Italy, this was probably Bava’s best gothic horror work and had some of the most gorgeous photography of all his films, aided by a good script and some fine acting. A must see for fans of Bava and gothic horror films in general, but think of it under its much better British release title – Curse of the Dead

Roy Colt e Winchester Jack (1971)

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

The end of the Bava, Bava & Freda non-horror works is Bava’s third and final Western Roy Colt e Winchester Jack

Bava’s twisted Gialli trilogy

Saturday, October 8th, 2011

Although Bava is credited with creating the Giallo with ‘Blood and Black Lace’, he never made another straight genre entry. Instead, the closest he came was with this trilogy of films from the early 1970s.

Five Dolls for an August Moon (1970) is certainly the most conventional of the three but still has a very strange atmosphere, sees most of the killings take place off screen and seems to reveal the killer part way through… or not.

A Bay of Blood (1971) has a very mixed up plot for a Giallo (although it does at least all resolve) but is most interesting for its twenty minute slasher movie sequence – made almost a decade before the slasher movie boom.

Hatchet for the Honeymoon (1970) is certainly the best of the trilogy and one of Bava’s very best. A psycho killer take on the genre, the main character is hunting the killer of his mother, a killer whose identity is blurred in his mind and revealed piece by piece when he kills…

Bava invents the Giallo in Sei donne per l’assassino

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

Bava made a few tentative steps in La ragazza che sapeva troppo, but here he really kicks off the Giallo genre in Blood and Black Lace which contains everything from the black gloved killer to the cast of attractive women but most importantly the genre’s focus on the gory details of the killings themselves.

La ragazza che sapeva troppo (1963)

Monday, September 26th, 2011

The first steps towards the Giallo came for Bava with this erudite mystery thriller La ragazza che sapeva troppo

Four Times that Night (1972)

Monday, September 19th, 2011

Bava’s forgotten entry to the sex comedy genre is a Rashamon inspired four-parter telling multiple stories of a couple’s first date. Unfortunately the good idea is rather poorly executed and the film remains a curio rather than particularly recommended.

Read our Four Times that Night review.